Breast Cancer in Men: Symptoms, Risk, Treatments and Genes

Breast Cancer in Men is a relatively rare cancer but one that doctors often diagnose in the later stages. Male breast cancer is a rare cancer that forms in the breast tissue of men. Though breast cancer is most commonly thought of as a disease that affects women, breast cancer does happen in men.

Male breast cancer is most common in older men, though it can happen at any age.

Men (identified a disease or its cause) with male breast cancer at an early stage have a good chance for a cure. Treatment usually involves surgery to remove the breast tissue. Other treatments, such as (using powerful drugs to help cure disease) and radiation therapy, may be recommended based on your particular situation.


Breast Cancer in Men


Breast Cancer in Men


Symptoms of Breast Cancer in Men

Signs and signs of male breast cancer can include:


  • A painless lump or thickening in your breast tissue.
  • Changes to the skin covering your breast, such as dimpling, (shrinking or gathering into folds), redness or scaling.
  • Changes to your nipple, such as redness or scaling, or a nipple that begins to turn inward
  • Discharge from your nipple.

Causes of Breast Cancer in Men:

It's not clear what causes male breast cancer.

Doctors know that male breast cancer occurs when some breast cells divide more rapidly than healthy cells do. The accumulating cells form a tumor that may spread (metastasize) to nearby tissue, to the lymph nodes or to other parts of the body.


How common is breast cancer in men?

Even so, male breast cancer is very rare. Less than one percent of all breast cancer cases develop in men, and only one in a thousand men will ever be (identified a disease or its cause) with breast cancer. Breast cancer in men is usually detected as a hard lump underneath the nipple and areola.

Is male breast cancer painful?

The main sign (of sickness) of male breast cancer is a lump in the breast area. Possible signs of male breast cancer include: a lump in one breast, which is usually painless. nipple withdrawal, (open, painful sore), and discharge.


Breast Cancer in Men


7 Facts To Know about Male Breast Cancer

Everyone, whether male or female, are born with some breast cells and tissue. Although males do not develop milk-producing breasts, a man%u2019s breast cells and tissue are still capable of developing cancer.
7 Facts To Know about Male Breast Cancer

The Pictures That Is Helping Women Detect Breast Cancer


Early last year, Facebook users were posting red hearts in support of breast cancer (knowing about something), and one woman opened up about why a "cute heart" isn't going to help save lives. Erin Smith Chieze posted the photo above on Facebook, giving a clear description of how breast cancer can look and feel, and it's becoming very well known for all the right reasons. In response to all the red hearts Erin has seen on Facebook, she explained the importance of these lemons.

"In December of 2015 when I saw a dent that looked like one of those pictures, I instantly knew I had breast cancer," she wrote. "I tried to feel for a tumor, but my tumor was non real. I was told he or she had a disease named breast cancer 5 days later and with stage 4 the following month. A heart did nothing for (knowing about something). I knew what breast cancer was. I knew all about self exams, but a picture of what to look for keyed me into knowing I had a terminal disease."

She continued, "We need to give REAL information, not cute hearts. Without having seen a picture randomly with real information, I wouldn't have known what to look for. Do us a favor, stop playing games with my life and start truly helping people. Deadly breast cancer treatment research and real (knowing about something)."

After feeling frustrated by the red hearts on Facebook, Erin took matters into her own hands and posted her touching story in an effort to help save lives the way an almost the same photo helped her identify her cancer. This image is part of the Know Your Lemons (series of actions to reach a goal) started by the Worldwide Breast Cancer organization. It's an incredibly information-giving graphic that both men and women should use for self-exams.

"PLEASE, stop playing games that do not actually (help increase/show in a good way) (knowing about something), they often cause people to tune out anything that might even talk about/say the word (knowing about something)," Erin wrote. "So if you truly want to help people WITH cancer, or those who will GET cancer, share photos like this one."

Find out more information about the Know Your Lemons (series of actions to reach a goal) here, and check out Erin's full post below.


Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

Breast Cancer in Men

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